Media Information

MEDIA ASSISTANCE INFORMATION

Contact Information

Museum’s Mailing Address and Phone Number:
201 W. 3rd Street
P.O. Box 545
Pine Bluffs, WY 82082-0545
Tel: 307-245-3713

Anthony J. Sacco
President/Chairman of the Board
Tel: 307-245-3713, or 307-638-9338
Fax: 307-638-9338
E-mail: AnthonyJSacco@hotmail.com

Jackie Mueller
Vice-President
Tel: 307-245-3775
Fax: 307-245-3713


Hours of Operation: Memorial Day through Labor Day, Tuesdays – Saturdays, 10am to 4pm.

Admission Policy: Free, but donations are requested. No smoking, drugs, or alcohol permitted on the premises.

Facilities: Parking, Rest Room, Playground, and Shaded Picnic Area.

Need Photographic Images? Go to the Exhibits page of this website.


Brief History of the Texas Trail Museum:

The Texas Trail Museum was formed in 1986 by a small group of dedicated individuals, in a building which was then the Power Plant/Fire House for the Town of Pine Bluffs. It is located at the corner of 3rd and Market Streets, next to a row of majestic pines, which shade a large picnic area and a historic marker for the Texas Cattle Trail.

Charter members were Norma Jean Anderson, Alice Benedict, Tim Cooney, Jack Curless, Olive Fornstorm, Mary Herman, Jackie Mueller, Jolene Simkins and Vickie Wilhelm. At its meeting in June 2007, the Board, by motion duly made, seconded and passed, voted to grant lifetime honorary membership to all of the Charter members.

When first formed, needing a place to display artifacts, the Board negotiated with the Town of Pine Bluffs during the weeks leading up to the Town’s centennial. On September 16, 1986, by Resolution 86-16, signed by Timothy T. Connor, Mayor and Dema Jo Gilbert, Clerk, the Town leased to the Texas Trail Museum:

“… a non-profit organization in the state of Wyoming, a building known as the ‘Old Power Plant,’ situated on the northwest corner of Market Street and Third Street in the Town of Pine Bluffs, Wyoming for the sum of one dollar ($1.00) per year.”

Begun with only a few women’s furs, dresses and hats, exhibits have since expanded to fill the building and then some. Today the museum is a 4-1/2 acre complex, which includes:

  • the Main Exhibition Hall,
  • the Agriculture and Transportation Building – made possible by the generosity of Curtis and Helen Bowser of Boulder City, NV. The Bowser family was an early homestead family near Hillsdale,
  • the de-commissioned Saint Mary’s Catholic Church,
  • the Muddy Creek School (the first one-room school house in southeastern Laramie County),
  • the Bowser Homestead Cottage (a classic example of how early homesteaders lived),
  • the Union Pacific Railroad is well-represented, with a caboose, a switchman’s shack and a telegraph shed,
  • the Brodine-Walker Boarding House, which had been run by local families who rented rooms to U.P. crewmen between assignments.

U.S. Route 30 (Lincoln Highway), the first completed paved highway linking Boston with San Francisco, runs along the north side of the museum property.

For more information call or fax 307-245-3713

Let us know if you wish to become a “Friend of the Museum“!